Green Onions by Booker T & The MGs

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Green Onions by Booker T & The MGs
Green Onions by Booker T & The MGs

Album Released: 1962

Green Onions ::: Artwork

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1.Green Onions2:45
2.Rinky-Dink2:39
3.I Got A Woman3:32
4.Mo' Onions2:50
5.Twist And Shout2:09
6.Behave Yourself3:45
7.Stranger On The Shore2:18
8.Lonely Avenue3:25
9.One Who Really Loves You2:22
10.I Can't Sit Down2:46
11.A Woman, A Lover, A Friend3:15
12.Comin' Home Baby2:09

Reviews

Booker T. & The M.G.s might not have come up with rock'n'roll's most famous albums, but they started a revolution.

Everybody knows this album's title track by heart, even if they don't recognize it by name. Go to YouTube and listen to it - you've heard it before. And if you've ever seen a film that takes place in the 60's, that's almost always what seems to be playing in the background - nostalgia filmmakers don't just love that track because everyone who actually lived in the 60's remembers it, but also because it's quite atmospheric and it's an instrumental. Why, “Green Onions” and movies seem like they were made for each other.

The one drawback of "Green Onions" being so popular over the years is that people have grown so used to it, that they've probably forgotten how positively earth-shattering it was. Booker T. & The M.G.s have a sound that's been said to turn 'goat piss into gasoline'. That statement will probably make sense once you sit down and listen to it. And I mean on its own, without the distraction of movies!

Some might wonder why these guys didn't have a singer. But once you give this record a spin, I hope you'll realize that it wasn't because they didn't have anyone good turn up at the auditions! These four guys are so good at their instruments that you'd have to be some kind of asshole to think they needed a singer.

Easily the most interesting 'factoid' about these guys was that they were an inter-racial band, back in 1962. Two members were black and two members were white. That wasn't just w-a-y before The Dave Matthews Band, it was even before Martin Luther King Jr. lead the march on Washington. And taking just one listen to this album, isn't it obvious that black people and white people were destined to get along with each other after all? Don't you hear those amazing rhythms that black drummer Al Jackson and white bassist Lewie Steinberg concoct together? ... and organist Booker T. and lead guitarist Steve Cropper play off each other in amazing ways too. After a moment of hearing the 'conversations' the organist has with the guitarist, it's clear that a lead singer would only have gotten in the way!

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by Reviewer: Don Ignacio (blogging at Don Ignacio's Album Reviews)