The Iron Man by Pete Townshend

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Soundtrack: The Iron Man by Pete Townshend
Soundtrack: The Iron Man by Pete Townshend

Album Released: 1989

The Iron Man ::: Artwork

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1.Pete Townshend & Deborah Conway: I Won't Run Any More4:30
2.John Lee Hooker: Over The Top4:02
3.Simon Townshend: Man Machines0:43
4.The Who: Dig3:59
5.Pete Townshend: A Friend Is A Friend5:30
6.John Lee Hooker: I Eat Heavy Metal3:50
7.Pete Townshend & Deborah Conway & Chyna: All Shall Be Well4:00
8.Pete Townshend: Was There Life3:30
9.Nina Simone: Fast Food4:00
10.Pete Townshend: A Fool Says ...2:30
11.The Who: Fire3:52
12.Pete Townshend With Chyna & Nicola Emmanuel: New Life / Reprise5:10

Reviews

So, having done a novel, Townshend turns his hand to a musical. And boy, does it stink ... "I Eat Heavy Metal" and "Fast Food" are in fact two of the worst songs I've ever heard!

There's also crappy ballads like "A Fool Says..." and "Was There Life", along with a rather anti-climatic ending in "New Life / Reprise". Reprise? God, no!

There are a few good numbers on here though - The Who show up to deliver the album's high point "Dig", as well as an okay cover of Arthur Brown's "Fire". And Disney-esque choirs show up in "I Won't Run Any More" and "Over the Top", which also manage to be decent songs. And "All Shall Be Well" even rocks a little in the chorus.

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by Reviewer: Cole Reviews


Based on a Ted Hughes poem cycle, this album is distressingly bad, and not even salvaged by the presence of various guest stars.

Townshend's stated goal was to craft a song cycle for a children's play, but I doubt kids would be able to stomach this. The main problem isn't that Townshend's weak melodies aren't that memorable, but that the music is flimsy and serves only as a backdrop for the lyrics.

In short, Townshend doesn't come up with any decent songs or hooks, a fault that is not covered up by inviting John Lee Hooker and Nina Simone to sing lead on a few numbers.

Townshend's so desperate he even reunites with The Who for a handful of tracks, which only succeeds in revealing that Daltrey's voice is shot, and the lads can't rock out very well any more.

Also, taken out of the context of the play (which I haven't seen ... did it even see release?), the likes of "I Eat Heavy Metal" and "Fast Food" seem like throwaway novelty numbers, and not very fun or charming ones at that.

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by Reviewer: Creative Noise